Every body is a swimming body: Sylvia Mac of Love Disfigure shares her swimming journey

Love Disfigure is an initiative born out of a need to raise awareness and support for those living with disfigurement. Founded by swimmer and swim teacher Sylvia Mac, who at the age of 48 dared to bare her scars for the first time. Sylvia’s advocacy is having a positive impact in a variety of areas, including setting up fortnightly swimming sessions for anyone with disfigurement.  Thank you Sylvia for sharing your story (and for your entry to the Women’s Adventure Expo #swimselfie competition!)

When I was 7 years old, my father subscribed myself and my sisters into the local swimming club. I was happy at first until I realised that the other children were staring at me and whispering. Before long, I was being called names such as ‘snakeskin’, ‘witch’ and ‘disgusting’.

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My elder sister managed to put a stop to it before it got worse. Because of this incident, I began to plan my route into and out of the swimming pool. When swimming began, I was the last person to leave the changing room and enter the pool. When our Coach called us out of the water, I would hide and pretend I had a stitch or cramp. I became quite popular with my Coach as the child who complained about everything. Little did he know, I was being bullied by the other swimmers, my team mates.

As my swimming improved my father entered me and my sister into League competitions and galas. I remember picking new swim costumes and they were all so revealing. I wouldn’t dare wear a costume with the big cut out hole in the back as this would only make my problems worse. I asked my mum for a big beach towel so my sister could wait at the end of a race with it ready to cover me up from everyone. My sister was my saviour as I never complained to anyone else about my problems. I remember one occasion swimming in a big competition at Crystal Palace leisure centre. At the end of my race, I couldn’t see my sister and became anxious in the water. I remember hearing the officials shouting and whistling at me to climb out of the water. I decided to ignore them and stay in the pool believing my sister would appear very soon. My sister never came until someone shouted over the speaker for me to get out of the pool. I swam under all the lanes to the other side of the pool and quickly ran to the changing room where I locked myself into a locker room. I stayed there until I heard my sister calling me. I was crying and screaming at her but she apologised as she had won her race prior to mine and was celebrating with her friends outside. 

I never won any of my races because I didn’t want to draw attention to myself so ‘pulled back’ during races. I wouldn’t dare ‘place’ in a swim competition because the thought of me being on a rostrum gave me anxiety attacks thinking about everyone staring at me.

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As I got older, I realised I wasn’t able to complete exams in school, college or university which meant I wouldn’t be able to achieve anything great in my life. I remember always attending interviews but when I arrived outside I would turn around and go back home. I always lied to my family telling them I did really well but lacking confidence and low self- esteem was always going to stop me in my tracks. I eventually went on to do office work which was never my thing and I was always shy around people worrying how long it would be before they sacked me.

I went on to work in schools with children as I always felt comfortable with them until one day I took them swimming with the teacher. When I arrived, I noticed 2 ladies working there that I use to swim with many years ago. They asked me if I wanted to come and teach swimming with them so I immediately took swim teacher courses and taught non-swimmer schoolchildren. I enjoyed my work so much that I then took on more work in the evenings teaching Adults to swim. I enjoyed teaching people to swim so much that I did extra evenings with special need children. Some years later I took another course in swim coaching and went on to work with a local swimming club teaching/coaching competitive swimmers. I worked in the club for a year until I began having problems with my back so had to give up work.

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When I was aged 3 years old, I was severely disfigured in boiling water from an accident at home. My sister was running with me through the house and we were told not to go into the bathroom as my mum had boiled saucepans of water and poured into bowls on the floor for our bath. We lived in a council flat in the East End of London and often ran out of gas and electric so my mum filled the bath for all 5 of my sisters to bathe. I almost died twice from my injuries but was lucky to pull through life support to tell my story today.

Last year July 2016 I went on holiday with my mother and son. Whilst laying around the pool sunbathing a man was videoing me and followed me back and forth. This made me extremely sad and upset that my mum decided we should go to the beach instead. We went up to our room and I put on a beautiful bikini which I would never think of wearing but was bought for me. We made our way to the beach and I could see my mum was very sad as she often stared at my burns and questioned if they hurt me. As I stared at her staring at me, I could feel her sadness so began walking down to the water’s edge. As I was walking I could feel everyone’s eyes on me and turned around to face my mum. I called out to her ‘mum, look at me’ and I began to smile and pose as if I was being photographed. I noticed her face change and she began smiling back at me. I went over to her and said, ‘mum from now on, when people photograph or video me, I will smile and pose then at least I will look great on youtube’.

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In October 2016, I released my own video on youtube and bared my scars. Aged now 49 years old, I decided I want to change my life and stop spending my days crying and hiding away so began a FB group called Love Disfigure. I raise awareness and show support for people living with a disfigurement by blogging on my website lovedisfigure.com and sharing beautiful photos of myself and my scars.

I recently released a story to BBC News called ‘my scar and me’ which was surprisingly released online BBC World News. I then went onto release an audio interview on BBC Radio 4 Woman’s Hour which can be found on BBC IPlayer. I will continue campaigning for those affected by their appearance whether scars, burns, marks, skin condition or health conditions. There are thousands of people around the world who continue to suffer with anxiety, depression, low self-esteem and PTSD and send me heartfelt messages. When I released my story, many of my friends didn’t know I was burned but only myself and my family knew. It was my choice to keep this to myself as many people continue to do every day in fear of being cast out. We need to let these people know that we are all unique and different in many ways. Do not let life pass you by as I did. I have wasted my life because I had no confidence in myself and my skin.

Today I can finally say ‘I am Beautiful, we are all Beautiful’.

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Connect with Love Disfigure on twitter, Facebook, Instagram and via their website.

A Lotus Rises is on a mission to increase visibility, access and participation of women in swimming. Our first collaborative workshop is at the Women’s Adventure Expo on 7th October.  Whether you’re returning to the pool, learning to swim or embarking on the English Channel we will be exploring all that open water has to offer with insights from across our women’s swimming collective and scientific contributions from the international institute of swim cake studies.

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Outdoor Swimming: A Gateway to Positive Change

It’s 1.15am and pitch black, apart from the flashing lights attached to my swimming cossy and hat. The gate to the back of the fishing boat is opened and I sit down, dangling my feet above the ‘tropical’ 16 degree Celsius English Channel, about to jump in for my third hour of swimming. I am so excited… our four women relay team is less than two hours from landing in France!

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Girls Night Out in the English Channel: Photo Credit Alice Gartland

Swimming is a life skill that is fundamental to being able to take to the water safely, whatever activity we choose; but it’s also a gateway to adventure, well-being and exploration in its own right.
From artist Vivienne Rickman Poole, who is documenting her journey to swim in all 250 lakes of Snowdonia (whatever the weather) and Sam Mould ’s exploration of the tarns in the Lake District, to swimmer- writers inspired by the water like Caitlin Davies, Jenny Landreth, Tanya Shadrick, Outdoor swimming is an activity in which women excel, empowering people’s lives both in and out of the water.

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Photo Credit Sam Mould

Not just a catalyst for creativity, outdoor swimming is a channel for international diplomacy, social justice and and positive change.

Becky Sindall, is a water scientist and swimming instructor volunteering with the charity Nile Swimmers in the Lebanon and Sudan to help tackle drowning in Africa, and since Lynne Cox’s 1987 swim of the Bering Straits, helping to melt the cold war, swim diplomats have been building bridges across the globe. For example on 5th May 2017 Kim Chambers brought together a team of international swimmers in the first ever swim from USA to Mexico, that’s following on from her August 2015 swim where she became the first woman to swim from the Farallon Islands to the Golden Gate Bridge – a distance of about 30 miles in waters famed for its Great White Shark inhabitants…If only Kim, Putin, Tump, Xi, May et al went and chilled out for a swim together…

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Photo Credit Beth French

It’s fair to say, women are dominating the world of endurance swimming at the moment. Chloe McCardel’s three way Channel Crossing and four way channel attempt is part of wave of women, like WAexpo speaker Beth French, redefining the parameters of what’s possible. The diversity of their swim adventures is also breath taking. For example, Jaimie Monahan’s recent swims include an Ice Zero Swim in Tyumen Russia, through to swimming 42.8 miles across Lake Geneva in 32 hours and 52 minutes. And it’s a sport for life, with Sal Minty Gravett and Pat Gallante amongst the leading lights.

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Jaimie Monahan swimming at the Jökulsárlón glacial lagoon, Iceland. Photo credit Arik Thomahlen

Of course, every swim journey starts with a single splash and the beauty of outdoor swimming is that it is accessible, requires very little kit (wetsuits are optional), and is as challenging as you want it to be: 8-10th August, the wonderful swim spirit Sarah Thomas swam a 104.6 mile route in Lake Champlain and this morning I did 4 lengths of my local lido – it’s all good!

Social media means it’s easy to find local swim groups (never swim outdoors alone) and you soon discover the joy of the outdoor swimming community, it’s love of cake and strong tradition of ‘giving back ‘ and helping others to realise their dreams. Check out the Outdoor Swimming Society, founded by Kate Rew for starters.

And it is very much a team sport, particularly when it comes to long distance challenges, where support crew are critical for route planning and ensuring the safety of the swimmer. Kayaker Shu Pu became the first person to paddle solo across the Pearl River Delta when she supported Simon Holliday on his 35km swim from Hong Kong to Macau and is now organising Simon’s swim around Hong Kong island this November.

Outdoor swimming is a liberator, known to alleviate anxiety and depression and was a sanctuary for me to rebuild my mind and body following a road traffic accident. It is also a ‘leveller’ – I still have no idea what most of the people I swim with ‘do’ for a living; and for a sport where everyone pretty much gets naked all of the time, body image seems irrelevant – I have never asked anyone if my bum looks big in a swimming costume.

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The Thames Marathon Swim: Photo Credit Dan Bullock

Whether splashing around in a loch in Skye, surrounded by seals and crying with laughter with a seaweed wig on my head, competing in international winter swimming festivals in China, or jumping in the English Channel at 1.15 am, the rewards of rewards of outdoor swimming are immense.

Back in the Channel, I finish my final hour of swimming and Kathrine takes over, landing us in France at around 2.40am. Exhausted, elated and wrapped up in our sleeping bags on deck, our sense of accomplishment and capability envelopes us as we sail home and a spectacular orange and pink sunrise emerges; it’s incredible what can happen when you take to the water…

Happy Swimming

Alice

A Lotus Rises, the swim blog for women who love Open Water. She’ll be presenting the Guide to open water swimming at WAExpo 2017, the Women’s Adventure Expo’s flagship event on the 7th of October, sponsored by Outdoor Swimmer Magazine and with assistance from the International Institute for Swim Cake Studies.

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Ellery McGowan #alotusrises

Ellery McGowan is an outdoor swimmer with a swim cv and sense of adventure that inspires the swimming community. Her swim highlights include Lake Zurich, Ederle, Manhattan, Toroneos Gulf and Kalamata plus 5 Channel relays and 4 Winter Swimming Championships, Most recently she completed an All Women Relay of the English Channel, setting a new record for the Oldest Women’s Channel Relay, with a combined age of 393. Team Members were Irene Keel (76), Ellery McGowan (70),Chris Pitman (66), Dee Richards (62) Sally Minty Gravett (59) and Kathy Batts (57) and the time taken to cross was 15 hours and 17 minutes. Ellery is also a swim teacher and swimming coach at Charterhouse.

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Ellery at Tooting Lido (note the leaf is not a tattoo!). Credit Ellery McGowan

In 2015 Ellery’s son James, an accomplished athlete, passed away from Adult Sudden Death Syndrome and she is now using swimming as a platform to raise awareness of Cardiac Risk in the Young , an organisation which draws attention to the range of conditions that can cause young sudden cardiac death. Each week in the UK at least 12 fit and healthy young people die of undiagnosed heart conditions. She has raised several thousand dollars in 2015 alone by her challenge undertaking “5 Swims in 5 Countries for a Five Star Son”.

A Lotus Rises caught up with Ellery to talk about her swimming journey, what inspires her and her adventures.

Why did you start outdoor swimming?

I taught myself to swim at aged 5 in an estuary in Tasmania and later swam in rivers and dams. There were no swimming pools in the vicinity of where I lived. However I took up masters swimming when I moved to Germany on 1991 and as I had never been in a club I could not even kick 25metres. I competed in Masters but in 2004 saw a stand in Riccione for SwimTrek and signed up for my first trip to Turkey. I loved every minute of it, swimming the Hellespont and a 10km swim across to Bozcaada among other swims. I felt at home once again.

What have been the highs and lows in your swimming journey and how do you stay motivated?

My first open water race was at the World Masters in Edmonton  in 2005 where I came back with a gold medal which surprised me…. That was a high!

My lowest of low was not making it to France as a solo in 2015. I was pulled out after 11 hours in the French Shipping lane. I hate not finishing what I set out to do and not completing Rottnest in February due to the strong currents and not making the cut-off was also disappointing

What do you think are the three most important things for effective swim training?

I train regularly but think self- discipline, consistency in training and motivation to do so and cross training are essential.

What three tips do you have for swimmers new to open water?

  • Swim with an open mind
  • Enjoy the experience- every swim will be different.
  • Don’t put stress on oneself by hoping to finish in an unrealistic time.
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Ellery enjoying the 30km Kalamata Swim in  2016. Credit Ellery McGowan

How do you prepare for your swim challenges?

I am fortunate that I can train by myself and have the self-discipline to do so, but I also go on training camps to be with like- minded people.

I have a feeding plan which works for me and I have used for the last seven years! (Maxim and High5 isogel alternating along with half a banana every 3 hours)

A “Tupperware” box goes with me containing “ouch” for jelly fish stings, Voltaren for inflammation, ibuprofen for pain relief, an anti-histamine cream, sturgeron for sea sickness, night lights, safety pins etc. I cannot recall when I last used any of these apart from Voltaren on my 30km Kalamata swim last September.

How do you avoid injury?

I listen to my body but after a shoulder injury over 10 years ago I concentrated on my technique. I do two Pilates sessions a week, one yoga and a gyrotonics to keep my body supple and for core strength. I also do two spin classes for cardio.

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Ellery and her record setting Channel Relay friends! Credit Ellery McGowan

Why did you do the English Channel relay? How was it?! 

We had planned to do a two way in 2015 but were weathered out and managed to start a one way. However a massive storm hit us for the last few hours. I remember at 11:00 at night swimming in lightening and hail for the whole of my swim with everyone else in the cabin of Anastasia sheltering. Two hours later the seas became rough, the boat was lifted out of the water as winds reached 40 knots and we had to call it a day for safety just 2 miles off the French Coast.

Kathy re-booked with Eddie Spelling for this year , first on the tide but as the weather was not so good we went a day early, with just one replacement member due to injury. The first relay was four months before James died and this was the first time I had been in the Channel since. We all felt the cold after our first night swim which was pretty rough too but we had a full moon which was beautiful. Conditions smoothed out during my second leg but the third was magical coming towards the white cliffs of Les Escalles. I swam very hard and was just 17 minutes from the landing. I felt James was with me all the way in that glorious sunshine.

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Ellery McGowan

Has swimming helped cope with your bereavement?

Most definitely. I think of him a lot during my swims and I know the money I raise is now going towards research and screening. We have two days of screening planned at Charterhouse in June which will be covered by money from James’ memorial fund.

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Most of all I look back and know that the cold water swimming has put me in a good place. I have no problem in getting into -0.2 water in Siberia with air at -15 and swimming a 100m race. The feeling afterwards is always elating.

Your swimming accomplishments range from marathon swims to winter swimming championship medals – do you have a favourite swim and also, what next?

Every swim is different because of the elements, but I think possibly Toroneos Gulf has been my favourite. I was invited to do this by a Greek marathon swimmer whom I met on “The Big Blue” after swimming Manhattan. He sadly died earlier this year, also at a young age, from cancer. The swim was 26 km in the beautiful Ionian Sea, a wonderful atmosphere and in Greece everyone who finishes is a winner. To swim in hearing Vangelis playing loudly and having a huge wreath of olive leaves placed over my head by two fellow Greek swimming friends was just amazing.

What is your favourite swim cake?

I am not a great cake eater but would never say no to any, especially a rum cake!

What is your favourite swimming costume for open water and why?

I have a few but at the moment it is knee length Agon with an Australian design and my name ELLERY emblazoned on the front. (Just in case I forget who I am!)

Out of the water A Lotus Rises…Thank you Ellery!

 

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Tough Girl Podcast #alotusrises

Really honoured to be on Sarah William’s Tough Girl Podcast, talking about the background to A Lotus Rises, how being hit by a lorry on the way to work the day before my 31st birthday helped change my path, how I got into outdoor swimming, tips for starting out in open water, adventures and challenges in and out of the water, China, career change, community, cake and the power and plans of our growing swimming collective.

Link to the interview here and you can also download it on iTunes and Soundcloud

 

Continue reading “Tough Girl Podcast #alotusrises”

A Lotus Rises at Adventure Uncovered Live

Exciting times! A Lotus Rises is presenting a swimspiratonal panel at Adventure Uncovered Live, part of a night of story telling exploring journeys with a purpose, at the ICA on 30th October. We’d love it if you can join us!

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Topics include “Sustainability and empowerment in everyday life“, “Social impact through responsible adventure“, “Adventures for Conservation” and “working towards a world free of plastic pollution“. This will be a fun interactive night of discussion on “realistic and underwhelming steps to positive change”.

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Becky Horsbrugh @BeckyRLH

Clearly, changing the world for the better one swim at a time is a team sport and in our panel “Outdoor Swimming A Gateway for positive Change” Alice is joined by the swimspirational Becky Horsbrugh whose swimming journey has taken her from open water novice to qualified swim teacher and drowning prevention advocate; working with local stakeholders in Bangladesh to develop a drowning prevention scheme.

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Emma Watson @moywatson #waitingforthecall campaign. Picture by Photographer Laura Ward @LauraKiora

Then we travel back to the streets, landmarks and public transport of London with Emma M Watson, to discuss how her empowering #waitingforthecall campaign, in which she is photographed in various every day situations in her Channel swimming gear, is raising awareness of endometriosis and challenging a myriad of preconceptions in the process. WE ARE EXCITED! May be we should follow Emma’s lead and present in our swimming costumes, hat and goggles…

#alotusrises #womensswimmingcollective #WSC  

#we’requiteexcitedthtourlogocanalsobeanicenevironmentallyfriendlygreentoo

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Beth French Ocean’s 7 Swim Challenge : It’s ok to not get where you thought you were going.

One final pre women’s adventure expo blog, catching up with headline speaker Beth French. We’re looking forward to hearing more tomorrow.
Beth embarked on a challenge to swim the Oceans 7 in 12 months. Having completed the Catalina Channel, Gibraltar Strait, Cook Strait (making a successful crossing just days after a thwarted first attempt,), Molokai Channel (including a close encounter with a shark at 1am in the morningBeth was well on course to achieve this epic challenge.
Then 7.5 hours and over 23km in to the 30km crossing  of the Tsugaru Strait, Beth made the decision to get out of the water, and on to the boat, marking the end of her Oceans 7 in 12 months challenge.
We caught up with Beth to find out more about the bold decision to stop, what she has learnt from her experiences and its impact on her life and plans for the future.

Why did you decide to get out of the water?
Getting out the water was not a snap decision. I got in the water intending to complete the swim. But after a couple Of hours, when my mind settled, the only thing i couldnt get rid of was the realisation of the detrimental impact the stress of all this was having on my autistic son over months. His stress levels meant that he was no longer coping with everyday life very well. I needed to show him he was more important than anything else. Reaching the other side was not just irrelevant at that stage, but was exactly the wrong thing to do. Telling him was not enough. I needed to show him. I swam for a further 5 hours to make sure that it wasn’t a blip, but it all came crashing down- the months we had both been coping, trying to juggle the stress and my trying to just carry him until the end of the project. I got out with a smile on my face, sure i was doing the right thing for my family. I have nothing to prove.

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What have been the highs and lows of your oceans 7 journey?
The highs are without doubt the amazing swimming community i have encountered around the world. People getting in touch and sharing my challenge, offering encouragement. And reaching a place in my life where i feel empowered and free, to change or remain as i see fit, in a life that i love. I think the lows will always be the concerns i had about Dylan not feeling safe when i was in the water. Its a horrible feeling knowing that what you are doing could be damaging your child. Luckily, dylan and i are incredibly close and we are looking forward to adventuring together more. It has taught him so much and i am immensely proud of him for managing to cope for 5 years of my channel swimming!

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What have you learnt? How do you feel physically and emotionally?

The biggest surprise to myself is that i feel stronger and better now than I did in September. With only 5weeks between each of the first 3 channels, it was a gamble as to whether the body can recover enough- add to that jetlag again and again! I feel physically better than i thought i had any right to feel. Its an amazing sensation. Emotionally, it’s been a bit up and down- i feel completely fine about my decision and happy with my ‘journey’ and all i have learned. After any major event, there is a slump. I have had 5 major events in a very short period of time. I am exactly where i need to be. In recovery. I am just surprised by how little my body is requiring rest. Yay!

What impact has this journey had on your understanding of challenge and adventure? What advice do you have for anyone embarking on a personal challenge?

I think a single channel swim teaches you about yourself. So many major swims so close together, yes, i learned about myself but i also learned about the very nature of challenge. The goal is somewhere to aim, passion and drive move you towards it, but the very personal reason to want to reach the end is different. It is like an unformed question, and if you find the answer to why you were there in the first place, the end result becomes irrelevant and so there is no failure, you have arrived!! I think i would advise people to know why you want your goal, and give it your all, without losing sight of why you wanted it in the first place.

How has your relationship with swimming and water changed, if at all?

I am so grateful for my relationship with water- it is where the world makes sense to me. I am free of all landbased external demands and expectations so i am free to explore my inner landscape. It is solace and my forum for challenge, all rolled into one.

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What next?
Enjoy getting wet, take time to adventure with dylan; wait for something to grab me. Its amazing knowing i have the capacity to go extreme, but i have nothing to prove. I have been adventuring since i was 18, so who knows what direction it will take me in next!

Cake was an integral part of your training. In your opinion, what, so far is the best swim cake for optimum swim performance?

The best performance cake ended up being a completely made up recipe that i called protein power. It was coconut flour, cocoa powder, condensed milk and egg. The texture was like fudge, but was so filled with energy!

What swimming costume did you wear for your swims and why?
For the swims i wore a tyr fusion swimsuit. I found they held up really well with all the Vaseline which usually trashes the suits and they were comfortable and didnt rub.

Thanks Beth – we can’t wait to hear more at the Women’s Adventure Expo. And even more excited now, following the release of her awesome Oceans 7 feature Documentary Trailer too!

 

 

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The Women’s Adventure Expo Guide to Open Water and #swimselfie Competition

 

Repost from The Women’s Adventure Expo Blog by Alice Gartland:

Win a years subscription to Outdoor Swimmer Magazine and a kit bag full of swim gear from Zoggs.

A Lotus Rises is  very excited to be delivering our Guide to Open Water Swimming at WAExpo 2017, the annual flagship event of the Women’s Adventure Expo CIC. Never afraid to tackle the important issues, we’ve got together with Outdoor Swimmer Magazine and Zoggs to try and answer one of the toughest questions in open water swimming – What makes the best #SwimSelfie? and support you on your swim adventures, whatever they may be!

Submit your pics to @WAEXPO and @ALotus_Rises with the hashtag #swimselfie, for the chance to win a year’s subscription to Outdoor Swimmer Magazine, a Kit Bag full of swim gear from Zoggs (1 x swim cozzie from a choice of three (size 8-20), the excellent predator goggles, swim hat, ear plugs, and towel), and 2 tickets to WAExpo 2017 held in Bristol on 7th October to inspire you on your swim adventures. Competition closes on Monday 2nd October.

The WAExpo 2017 will feature workshops and talks on all aspects of outdoor adventures, including talks from Beth French, SUP adventurer and ocean advocate Cal Major and Endurance Athlete Anna McNuff – it’s going to be awesome!

The underwater #SwimSelfie – breathing and timing is critical.

We love swimming!

 

The oh-my-goodness-we’ve-just-met-our-open-water- Olympic -heroine-Keri-anne Payne  #SwimSelfie

 

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The in the middle of a swim race in Sydney Harbour, but it’s ok sharks don’t eat swimmers do they? #Swimselfie

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Photo Credit Kristy McIntyre

The pre race excited/feeling a bit sick team Ireland, USA, Russia and UK  #swimselfie

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The UNESCO world heritage site #SwimSelfie

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The we’ve just finished a swim race and now we’re eating cake #SwimSelfie

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Photo Credit Lisa Peake

 

We’re storming a castle in a loch on Skye whilst wearing seaweed wigs and crying with laughter #SwimSelfie

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Photo Credit Gill Williams

In the middle of an English Channel Relay fancy dress including the pilot – it’s ok someone else is steering the boat #swimselfie

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A Lotus Rises is on a mission to increase visibility, access and participation of women in swimming. Our first collaborative workshop is at the Women’s Adventure Expo on 7th October.  Whether you’re returning to the pool, learning to swim or embarking on the English Channel we will be exploring all that open water has to offer with insights from across our women’s swimming collective and scientific contributions from the international institute of swim cake studies.

 

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